Prosecutors Expose ‘Silk Road’ Bitcoin Laundering Trail ...

I bought an old laptop that had a USB drive on it. It has a text file and 7z file on it. Not sure what to do with it. Showed it to a security guy and he offered me 100 bucks for it all so now I think it's worth something so I said no thanks.

OK I'm convinced that there is a Bitcoin wallet in this 7z file. From careful examination it looks like this person was using 10s of bitcoin back in 2013 and 2014 to use on the old Silk road onion site, I see corrupted text in the undeleted notes text file but I clearly see some onion URLs from past markets. It seems like once the market was closed down his interest in Bitcoin faded.
If anybody would like to seriously help me get this file open I'll share 20% of the balance
Here's the text file contents (I added notes)
d-3
elwfrlq 2ls sdvvzrug:
udfkho xvhv Vkls Vwdwlrq (THIS HERE IS THE PASSWORD)
Jlyh wr Dqguhz, 7.4 elwfrlqv. (So far we THINK this says 7.4 bitcoin, however other numbers in the cyphered text show problems leading me to think that it might be another number, but more then 0, I'm certain 7 is not 0 here)
Hudvh dqg ghvwur1 wklv gulyh diwhu
I gave nobody a copy of the file, only this text.
There is a text file I recovered that looks like this person has dealt with hundreds of bitcoins before 2014, it seems as if this is the last time anything was updated before deleted.
submitted by PM_ME_UR_HOT_SELF to RBI [link] [comments]

How It Happened (xpost from /r/SilkRoad)

I'm currently reading through the criminal complaint, which covers a lot of things worth noting with regard to how and why DPR got caught.

Now, onto how he got caught...

Second murder conspiracy allegation

Miscellaneous notes

THIS IS A WORK IN PROGRESS AND WILL BE UPDATED RAPIDLY.
submitted by sr_downfall to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How It Happened

I'm currently reading through the criminal complaint, which covers a lot of things worth noting with regard to how and why DPR got caught.

Now, onto how he got caught...

Miscellaneous notes

THIS IS A WORK IN PROGRESS AND WILL BE UPDATED RAPIDLY.
submitted by sr_downfall to SilkRoad [link] [comments]

Doubts cast over FBI 'leaky CAPTCHA' Silk Road rapture

Rather than a conspiracy involving NSA wiretaps, the FBI claims the downfall of Silk Road begun with a leaky CAPTCHA.
Responding to a request for information from former kingpin Ross Ulbricht's defence lawyers, the Feds says the CAPTCHA left a trail from the TOR-protected Silk Road servers to the public Internet. That revealed the location of the drug marketplace, which would otherwise have remained hidden behind TOR, according to an FBI affidavit.
FTI Consulting security man Christopher Tarbell revealed that in June last year during his tenure with the US federal police agency he found the CAPTCHA had leaked header information that revealed the IP address of the website.
"In order for the IP address of a computer to be fully hidden on Tor, however, the applications running on the computer must be properly configured for that purpose. Otherwise, the computer’s IP address may leak through the traffic sent from the computer," Tarbell said in the document [pdf].
"The IP address leak we discovered came from the Silk Road user login interface ... upon examining the individual packets of data being sent back from the website, we noticed that the headers of some of the packets reflected a certain IP address not associated with any known Tor node as the source of the packets.
"When I typed the Subject IP Address into an ordinary web browser, a part of the Silk Road login screen (the CAPTCHA prompt) appeared [which] indicated that the Subject IP Address was the IP address of the Silk Road server, and that it was leaking because the computer code underlying the login interface was not properly configured at the time to work on Tor."
The CAPTCHA was the only source of non-Tor packets but Ulbricht had struggled with the complexities of online anonymity, Tarbell claimed. The ex-FBI man said Ulbricht's computer revealed he doused IP-leaking spot fires that saw the website subject to distributed denial of service attacks (DDoS) and migrated to new servers.
But security bod Nicholas Cubrilovic who spent significant time probing Silk Road doubted the bust was as simple as a borked CAPTCHA on the grounds that the anti-spam generator was hosted on the Silk Road server, and alleged the affidavit omitted information regarding more direct application exploitation and fuzzing.
"Anybody with knowledge of Tor and hidden services would not be able to read that description and have a complete understanding of the process that the agents followed to do what they claim to have done," Cubrilovic said.
"Were the Silk Road site still live today, and in the same state it was as in back in June 2013 when the agents probed the server, you wouldn't be able to reproduce or recreate what the agents describe in the affidavit ... [the CAPTCHA] theory does not stand up to scrutiny because the Silk Road image CAPTCHA was hosted on the same server and at the same hidden URL as the Silk Road website.
"The idea that the CAPTCHA was being served from a live IP is unreasonable. Were this the case, it would have been noticed not only by me – but the many other people who were also scrutinizing the Silk Road website. Silk Road was one of the most scrutinized sites on the web, for white hats because it was an interesting challenge and for black hats since it hosted so many Bitcoin (with little legal implication if you managed to steal them)."
Moreover, an externally hosted image would still be routed over Tor and any packet sniffer would be unable to detect the Silk Road's IP address.
Cubrilovic claimed it was more likely the FBI found and exploited a security vulnerability or discovered an information leak in the Silk Road login page and application.
Those vulnerabilities which revealed the public IP address including a var_dump likely from inexperienced live debugging were made public on Stack Exchange -- Cubrilovic suggested the FBI may have taken advantage of these errors to locate Silk Road.
"This would explain why the FBI included the statement about 'typing in miscellaneous entries into the username, password, and CAPTCHA fields', because they needed to enter an exploit command to prompt the server to either dump or produce the IP address variable."
In this scenario, the description of packet sniffers and 'inspecting each packet' is all a distraction from what the FBI really did. Technically, saying that a packet sniffer revealed the true IP address of the server is true – what isn't mentioned is the packet sniffer was picking up responses from a request to the login page that was forcing it to spit out the IP address as part of a bug."
He thanked security bods the The Grugq and Harisec for research input, and called for the tech community to share any mirrors they had of Silk Road during 2013.
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/09/08/leaky_captcha_behind_fbis_silk_road_rapture/
submitted by TimBingham to SilkRoad [link] [comments]

What the NSA really thinks of Tor

This NSA Top Secret document includes an official declaration by the NSA about whether Tor protects Tor users and keeps Tor users anonymous. A URL at the bottom of this post leads to a true copy in the Guardian of the NSA document, which is from the Snowden archives.
Excerpt of text in NSA document, pages 1 and 2:
TOP SECRET//COMINT//REL FVEY
Stinks
CT SIGDEV
JUN 2012
Declassify On: 20370101
TOP SECRET//COMINT//REL FVEY
TOP SECRET//COMINT//REL FVEY
Tor Stinks...(u)
We will never be able to de-anonymize all Tor users all the time. With manual analysis we can de-anonymize a very small fraction of Tor users, however, no success de-anonymizing a user in response to a TOPI request/on demand.
TOP SECRET//COMINT//REL FVEY
On 4 Nov 2013, a Guardian article included a report on the increasing use of Tor after NSA whistle blower Edward Snowden revealed NSA Top Secret documents in June 2013: "What is Tor? A beginner's guide to the privacy tool"
According to the Tor Project's own figures, between 19 August and 27 August alone, which was about 2 months after Snowden's revelations, the number of people using Tor more than doubled to 2.25 million before peaking at nearly 6 million in mid-September. It has since slipped back to just over 4 million.
Since June 2013, how many people have learned for the first time about Tor and Tails, especially since the acclaimed documentary film Citizenfour received an Academy Award on 22 February 2015. At the end of the film, which stars Edward Snowden and others, the film credits acknowledge that Tor and Tails played a role in making the film possible.
How many people use Tor today. 4 million? 10 million? 50 million? 100 million? More? Less? Who knows? Whatever the number, the NSA does not like the fact that people outside of the intelligence community use Tor in the United States and other countries around the world.
On March 12, 2013, the United States Congress Senate Select Committee on Intelligence convened a public hearing. Cable television covered the live hearing. Senator Ron Wyden was present at the hearing as a member of the committee, which had summoned United States Director of National Intelligence James Clapper to answer questions and give official testimony before Congress about whether the United States government was spying on millions of people in the United States. Senator Wyden asked Director Clapper the following question: "Does the NSA collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of Americans?" Clapper lied and said “No...”
This lie by one of the top ranking officials in the United States intelligence community begs the following questions:
Would the NSA disseminate misleading or false information on the Internet to discourage the public from using Tor? Would the NSA disseminate misleading or false information that states the public should not use Tor because it is dangerous to use Tor, and Tor is not effective? Would someone working for the NSA post misleading or false information about Tor and Tails on the Reddit web site or other sites to discourage the public from using Tor?
On Oct 2, 2013, the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation made the high-profile arrest of Ross William Ulbricht, who was the founder and operator of the Silk Road web site. That same month, the Federal Bureau of Investigation shut down the web site. About 2 years 8 months before Ulbricht's arrest, Ulbricht launched the Silk Road site in February 2011. The Silk Road site was a criminal enterprise where many types of illegal drugs, many other illegal items, and many illegal services were available for purchase.
Ulbricht was a Tor user, and his Silk Road web site was a Tor Hidden Service, which means that the web site was available only on the Tor Network. The Silk Road site was not in any Internet search engine index. Ulbricht used Tor to engage in most or all of his illegal transactions, and his Silk Road site used Tor for all transactions.
In the summer of 2013, the Silk Road web site had 957,000 registered user accounts. During the period that the Silk Road was online, the total value of the purchases on the site amounted to USD $1.2 billion. Ulbricht's commissions on those transactions amounted to USD $80 million. All transactions were in Bitcoin.
The pursuit, tracking, and identification of Ulbricht involved the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation, the United States Drug Enforcement Administration, the United States Internal Revenue Service, and the United States Homeland Security Investigations agency. Those government departments and agencies might have expended up to tens or hundreds of millions of dollars and tens of thousands of man hours or more to track and eventually identify Ulbricht and his location. The successful tracking, identification, and location of Ulbricht by the United States government was not due to any technical or system vulnerabilities in Tor.
After expending immense resources and capital over an extended period, the United States government eventually was able to identify Ulbricht's real name and location because Ulbricht foolishly posted his email address: rossulbricht[at]gmail.com and the name Silk Road in a bitcointalk.org public forum where the whole world, including the FBI, could read Ulbricht's Gmail address next to the Silk Road name.
The FBI went to Google, and Google gave information from Ulbricht's Gmail account and information from his Google+ account to the Federal Bureau of Investigation. That account information included Ulbricht's home address. No weakness in Tor brought down Ross William Ulbricht. He brought himself down by revealing his real identity on a popular web site forum.
During Ulbricht's trial in a Manhattan, New York federal court, prosecutors alleged that Ulbricht paid $730,000 to other people to have them murder six people. No one actually murdered any of Ulbricht's intended victims. Ultimately, the government did not prosecute Ulbricht for any of the alleged murders. Some of the information that the government investigation uncovered showed that Ulbricht paid one person USD $150,000 to kill a person who was attempting to blackmail Ulbricht. The blackmailer told Ulbricht that he would reveal online the names and addresses of thousands of Silk Road's biggest customers and vendors unless Ulbricht paid him USD $500,000. The government found no evidence that Ulbricht's hired killer actually killed anyone. On the surface, it appears that the blackmailer and the hired-killer might be the same person, and the person scammed Ulbricht out of USD $150,000.
On May 29, 2015, a federal court in Manhattan, New York, handed Ulbricht five sentences, including two sentences for life imprisonment without the possibility of parole. The court also ordered that Ulbricht forfeit USD $183,000,000. Ulbricht is now serving his sentences. As of June 2015, Ulbricht is under incarceration at Metropolitan Detention Center, Brooklyn, New York.
The point of this post is not to celebrate Ulbricht or his criminal activities. The point is to illustrate that although the United States government expended huge amounts of resources and capital to track and eventually identify Ulbricht and his location, his capture had nothing to do with any weakness in Tor.
If a Tor or Tails user, such as a political dissident living under an oppressive regime, a government whistle blower, or any law abiding person, knows how to use Tor and Tails correctly and avoids making mistakes that reveal his or her name and location, that person and his or her location are likely to remain anonymous and unknown to any cyber spies, web information brokers, or cyber trackers.
Maybe all Internet users who value their right to privacy, right to anonymity, and right to be free from cyber tracking should use Tor and/or Tails. Maybe we should not be obedient, should not give up our right to privacy, should not give up our right to be anonymous, and should not submit to life under a surveillance police state. People under the Soviet Union, Nazi Germany, and North Korea submitted. Look what happened to them.
– LINKS --
4 Oct 2013, The Guardian "'Tor Stinks' presentation - read the full document": www.theguardian.com/world/interactive/2013/oct/04/tor-stinks-nsa-presentation-document
5 Nov 2013 The Guardian "What is Tor? A beginner's guide to the privacy tool" www.theguardian.com/technology/2013/nov/05/tor-beginners-guide-nsa-browser
Wikipedia, James R. Clapper: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_R._Clapper
Wikipedia, Silk Road: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silk_Road_%28marketplace%29#Arrest_and_trial_of_Ross_William_Ulbricht
Wikipedia, Ross William Ulbricht: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ross_William_Ulbricht
Beginning on Page 24, this Sealed Complaint has a detailed description of each of Ulbricht's personal mistakes and blunders that enabled the United States government to track, identify, and locate Ulbricht due to the fact that he revealed his real identity on a popular web site forum and made other unnecessary and avoidable mistakes and blunders. This court document is on the Columbia University web site.
Sealed Complaint United States Magistrate Judge Southern District of New York United States v. Ross William Ulbricht: www.cs.columbia.edu/~smb/UlbrichtCriminalComplaint.pdf
submitted by smoothgravity to privacy [link] [comments]

How It Happened

I'm currently reading through the criminal complaint, which covers a lot of things worth noting with regard to how and why DPR got caught.

Now, onto how he got caught...

Second murder conspiracy allegation

Miscellaneous notes

THIS IS A WORK IN PROGRESS AND WILL BE UPDATED RAPIDLY.
submitted by sr_downfall to TheRoad [link] [comments]

Beyond Silk Road: Potential Risks, Threats, and Promises of Virtual Currencies Bitcoin Prices Surge -- Silk Road: The Movie -- Bitcoin Erotica! Message To Marshal Mathers and Royce Da 5’9. The Truth About Ross Ulbricht's Appeal Le top 5 des anecdotes incroyables sur le Bitcoin

Bitcoin is a distributed, worldwide, decentralized digital money … Press J to jump to the feed. Press question mark to learn the rest of the keyboard shortcuts. r/Bitcoin. log in sign up. User account menu. 357. How It Happened (xpost from /r/SilkRoad) Close. 357. Posted by. u/sr_downfall. 6 years ago. Archived. How It Happened (xpost from /r/SilkRoad) I'm currently reading through the ... Bitcoin Hodler bereiten sich auf stürmische Zeiten vor; Österreich: Bitpanda erhält 52 Millionen Dollar – auch von Peter Thiel; Ethereum 2.0: Zwei Millionen Test-Ether gestaked ; Jetzt handeln: Plus500. Schnelleinstieg für den Handel von Krypto CFDs. Kryptowährungen handeln bei einem der führenden Anbieter für Krypto CFDs. Bitcoin $ 10,840.97 1.06%. Ethereum $ 362.75 2.09%. Tether $ 1 ... Oct 2, 2013 5:18 pm ET Federal Bureau of Investigation During its two and a half years in existence, Silk Road generated revenue of more than 9.5 million bitcoins and collected more than 600,000 ... Officials in Britain, Sweden and the US have arrested eight more people in connection with Silk Road, the website for criminal services, as the search for millions of dollars in bitcoins – the currency of choice for online users – steps up a gear. Immediately after the Silk Road was taken down in 2013, a marketplace known as the Silk Road 2 launched. The new darknet market was run by a person who called himself the Dread Pirate Roberts 2 ...

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Beyond Silk Road: Potential Risks, Threats, and Promises of Virtual Currencies

Bitcoin hit its all time high since 2014 today, and it’s there today and growing in part thanks to the start it got on the Silk Road. It’s been over a year since Ross’ sentencing to double ... Cape Town, South Africa -- I'm hoarding hyperinflation and I'm coming in for a hard landing. -- Here are today's MadBits: Bitcoin prices are steady. near the $100 mark. With a Last of 102, a High ... I started using Bitcoin in 2013 on The Silk Road, a darknet market place. I went away for a "Vacation" in 2015 for my Silk Road "Activities". I was released and invested my small bitcoin fortune ... Written by Alex Oates Directed by Dominic Shaw Meet Bruce Blakemore, a struggling young Geordie tech-head and the unlikeliest international criminal mastermind you can imagine. From his base in ... Vous pouvez me tiper directement en bitcoin à cette adresse: 1FboUA5ZvzTXyUGEugSFct1bixjEsZjGmx Ou sur tipeee en suivant ce lien : https://www.tipeee.com/le-...

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